A Year without Windows – the hardware

When you sit in an office in Liberia working, you are faced with a multitude of problems, poor power, little or no air conditioning, bad Internet (think 3G… as long as it is not raining and when it rains, there’s no connection), and hot sticky weather mixed with salt-laden air in the capital city of Monrovia.   Perfect setup for IT equipment?

I learned a lesson from the install at the medical school, equipment corrodes here very quickly.  I also learned not to get too attached to your personal workstation.  Two of my coworkers had very expensive MAC’s stolen out of their bedrooms in a guarded apartment while they were sleeping.   One of the thefts was done by a guard.

The last thing I think about is what kind of image I want to portray.  If I show up with a $2,000 laptop what does that mean to the people I am here to help?   Does a $2,000 laptop really get my email any faster?  Do I do some kind of exotic work with super powerful software requiring hyperspeed processing?  The answer is almost always no.  So what kind of equipment do I carry (and it has to run Ubuntu really well).

I ended up picking a low end Acer Aspire V5 – it cost me $259 new.  It’s small, light, uses little power and has a pretty good processor.  What I did next was to ‘enhance’ it a bit.  I replaced the harddrive with a 500GB SSD and upgraded the ram to 16gb.

acerv5

I decided to leave the WIndow OS on its own partition in case I needed to run Windows (now running Windows 10) and loaded Ubuntu 14.04 LTS.  I added a small external shell to the unit as a bit of protection plus it provides a little bit more venting when on my lap.  It also helped it survived several dops by the TSA when checking through various airports.

The Acer will run for about 8 – 10 hours on battery which is really plenty.  The power supply is pretty small and lightweight and has the added bonus of interchangable plugs so you can go from US to Euro without a separate adapter.  The WiFi chip appears to pickup and hold signals as good as anything else I have ever used.

My total investment on this unit was: $259 + SSD ($139) + ram ($69) = $467.  So I could buy three more of these and give them away to my co-workers in Liberia for the price of one high end laptop.   Yes, it has a small screen but I find that easier than a big screen to handle in a cramped economy class seat flying across the Atlantic for 10 hours.  As for power to run applications, once i replaced the hard drive and added memory, I am able to run everything including VM instances so I can test new software.