The day when Rick and WPI grad student Chris go to the US Embassy

bead retriever

Bead Retriever

That picture is of a working Thermo Fisher Scientific ‘Bead Retriever’ running in a lab.  Our lab in Tappita had two of these at a cost of $18,000 each.  They cut by 2/3’s the amount if time it takes to prepare samples for analysis.  With the unit running we could run maybe 60 samples (as in potential Ebola patient samples) a day.  Without, 20.   Trouble was, both units stopped working so they were sent back to the CDC at the US Embassy here.  It might be three to five weeks to get replacements.  So Chris and I offered to take a look.  We called Thermo Fisher and got a tentative nod, unfortunately tech support was not available.  Working off each other (ok, we got a little loud so they put us in our own room) for about 2 hours (did I mention that Chris is a robotics expert? Handy to have when working on a robotic system like this) we had one of the moments.  We had the little units apart and were taking it apart piece by piece when we said, “what if that little motor was supposed to have that screw running through it?”   Another 20 minutes and when we pressed ‘start’ we got the message indicating it was ready to run the samples (we actually did not have any samples).   We did the same thing on the other unit, same result.  Next step… Tuesday the lab guys (the ones that know how to use this thing) will do a dry run with fake samples to see if we really fixed.   Just goes to show you what two engineers with a screwdriver and a Leatherman can do.